08 lipca 2016
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit (photo by Andrzej Hrechorowicz / KPRP)
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NATO needs to prove that it is a living, strong and reliable alliance, and to do it must considerably strengthen its defensive and deterring capability, President Andrzej Duda said on Friday, the opening day of the NATO summit in Warsaw.

"Here in Warsaw NATO must prove that it is and will remain a living, strong and reliable alliance for peace, freedom and democracy. In order for it to be able to remain this way, it will need to considerably reinforce its deterring and defensive capability", the president said at the opening of a Warsaw Summit Experts' Forum accompanying the NATO summit attended together with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg.

According to Andrzej Duda, the biggest threat to the security of the NATO members were not countries or nations, but "a policy of force which ignores the norms of international law, and even such basic norms as the right to territorial integrity or sovereignty".

Andrzej Duda stressed that it was equally important for NATO to respond to threats from the East as from the South, and excluded giving priority to one over the other. He added that the NATO members together had to show their disagreement to "intimidation and aggression", which called for raised NATO presence in Central and Eastern Europe and an "adequate response" to challenges resulting from conflicts in North Africa and the Middle East.

Reminding that faith in the endurance of the present international order had been shaken by events like the annexation of Crimea, the Donbas conflict, the Syrian war, terrorism and mass migration, Duda stressed that this posed obligations for politicians, who now had to "do everything" to enable citizens to live in peace, free of fear.

"Together we must do everything to enable our citizens to fulfil their basic desire, the desire to live in peace and freedom from insecurity and fear", the president said.

President Duda stressed that Poland has for years supported the Baltic countries by engaging itself in raising security in the Baltic region and the eastern NATO flank. In this context he reminded that Poland was a member of the anti-IS coalition, has raised its defence spending and was modernising its armed forces.

According to Duda the Warsaw NATO summit was also an opportunity to give a "new impulse" to NATO's open-door policy, and in this connection welcomed Montenegro's accession to the Alliance.

Duda also spoke out for strengthening ties with Georgia, Ukraine and Moldova, and NATO support for partners in insecure regions in North Africa and the Middle East.

Jens Stoltenberg stressed that the Warsaw summit was a "landmark summit" and was taking place at a deciding moment in view of unpredictable threats and complex challenges coming from various directions. In this context he added that NATO was not seeking confrontation or a new Cold War, but "a constructive and meaningful dialogue with Russia".

"NATO doesn’t seek confrontation, we don’t want a new Cold War. The Cold War is history, and it should remain history. (...) We will continue to strive for a meaningful and constructive dialogue with Russia", Stoltenberg declared.

Commenting the summit's expected decisions, Stoltenberg said the meeting would confirm the further strengthening of the Alliance's defensive and deterring capability, including raised presence in its eastern regions - Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, each of which will receive a multinational battalion. This, Stoltenberg said, will "send a very a clear message – than an attack on one Ally will trigger the response from the whole Alliance".

Stoltenberg also extended thanks to Canada, Germany, Britain and the US for their readiness to lead the reinforcement battalions in Central and Eastern Europe, and announced the transformation of a Romanian brigade into a multinational unit to raise NATO military presence on the Alliance's southern flank.

British decision shows NATO solidarity

The stationing of 150 British troops in Poland in keeping with recent reinforcement decisions shows that NATO is together, that we are bound by solidarity, President Andrzej Duda said Friday at Warsaw's National Stadium, site of the beginning NATO summit.

Andrzej Duda said he was very pleased with Britain's decision to send 150 troops to Poland, and remarked that the move proved the Alliance's readiness to raise security levels, adding that „that there was a readiness to strengthen our security".

On Thursday British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon told PAP that 650 British troops would be sent for "permanent rotational training" on the eastern NATO flank. Five hundred soldiers will station in Estonia, 150 in Poland. (PAP)